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A Show of Hands

Hands put over another, palms down.

Hands put over another, palms down. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I believe that you will find that many of these “nuggets” so to speak are entirely common sense. However you will also find that often they make more sense than anything. I am sure that you would never be guilty of not washing your hands after using the restroom, but this post is for all of those other people. Perhaps this is a good one to refer to someone you know that might be a bit slack in the hand washing  department.

If you work for a company that has common restrooms that are shared between guests and employees it is very critical that you appear to the guest to be overly clean when you are using the restroom. I have spoken of Ralph Lawrence before, my training Manager and GM with McDonald’s. He was always giving me advice that I found myself passing on to others that worked for me. One time I came out of the restroom and was putting on my gloves. He pulled me aside and asked me if I had washed my hands. I told him I not only washed them I didn’t touch the handle when I came out of the restroom. He then told me, “Once fir them and twice for us.” I looked at him like he had two heads, as I often did when he would say something pithy, and he proceeded to explain. I was told that it was good for anyone who was in the restroom to see me wash my hands, and he praised me for it. Then he mentioned it was always a good idea to do it again where managers and others would see you so that everyone knows you did so. That made a lot of sense to me. You want to always give the appearance that the guest and their food is the most important thing to you.

How you appear to them is very important, and trust me, the one time you don’t it will get noticed somewhere. I can think of several occasions that staff members have dealt with documentations or possibly termination because the guest saw something that the staff member saw as inconsequential.

Pardon the expression, but it is always better to be safe than sorry. As Forrest Gump would say, “and that’s all I have to say about that.”

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The Intangibles

Charles Barkley representing the 1992 Dream Team

Charles Barkley representing the 1992 Dream Team (Photo credit: dgaproductions)

All throughout my life I have been a sports fan. I love to watch some of the greats and how they play. Basketball, Football, Baseball ad other sports it was always amazing to see the huge upsets or the amazing plays. Men  receive Hall of Fame status because of the ability to do great things constantly.Names like Michael Jordan, Ryne Sandberg, Dan Marino, Charles Barkley, Greg Maddux, and Mike Singletary. Some very vivid memories come from plays made by these great athletes. There were other names that I heard of men who never really made the same splash in every category on the statistics sheet, but nonetheless they had a series of intangibles that they brought to the court everyday as well. Does anyone remember when John Paxson drained the three pointer in 1993 during the Championship game to beat the Suns? I am a Suns fan, and I remember the blood draining from my face. Dan Majerle was famous for his last second heroics and his defense. Mark Clayton made Dan Marino look amazing. I remember following Cedric Ceballos when he was with the Suns, and remember his coaches always saying that they never ran a play specifically for him. Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman, A.C. Green and Steve Tasker are some guys that had amazing facets to their game that made them amazing in there own areas of excellence to make big plays at any given time.  I speak of these guys because these are the types of individuals I want to focus on in this post.

Greg Maddux in 2006

Greg Maddux in 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In management it’s hard not to focus on those “Rock Star” employees, because they run up the most sales on a given night, or they seem to handle the front desk best when there is a rush from a bus. These are revenue driven tasks and they are vitally important to the team. They are people we feel like we can build a team around because often they are charismatic and full of energy. Those people deserve attention; however, here are other people that you should make sure you witness as well. Some of these people work hard in the support roles, or they bring special talents to the table that may be outside of their job code. These are many different kinds of gemstones with beautiful facets, but their colors emerge when they are polished. A person with great organizational skills can be consulted on their ideas about group dining practices. The person who is always bringing fun to the group would be great to assist with planning company parties. Maybe you have a blogger in your group that could help publicize your company. Finding ways to utilize those hidden talents is the best way to make them feel appreciated and lighten your management load.

English: Chicago Bulls Scottie Pippen 1995

English: Chicago Bulls Scottie Pippen 1995 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Those people make great role players for your team and can get often overlooked. The key to great management that takes you to the Hall of Fame as a coach, so to speak, is your ability to develop your diamond in the rough and find beautiful places for them to sparkle. The key to building great teams is making the bench players feel like integral parts of the game at every level.

In addition to the great team that you have created you need to find ways to improve upon that. In the off season or when a hiring push is about to arise it’s a good idea to create a depth chart to assess which areas of the organization are strong and where you have opportunities for improvement. Then you can analyze your players and see what traits seem to make them strong and look for similar traits ion new candidates for positions with your company.

If you take the time and analyze your staff and find ways to reward those with the hidden aspects that make them special it will benefit you on many levels.

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